Chemistry and Mathematics MChem, BSc

Year of entry

2024 course information

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UCAS code
F1GC
Start date
September 2025
Delivery type
On campus
Duration
4 years full time
Work placement
Optional
Study abroad
Optional
Typical A-level offer
AAA (specific subject requirements)
Typical Access to Leeds offer
ABB
Full entry requirements

Course overview

Student working in the lab.

Chemistry is a central science at the core of everything we can see, smell, taste and touch around us while mathematics has always played an intrinsic role in helping comprehend chemistry and unlocking new perspectives in the chemical world. It’s for this reason that these two fundamental disciplines have become invaluable in tackling global challenges faced by society today such as climate change. This is also why a joint honours degree in both could equip you with skills highly sought after by a wide range of industries worldwide — and could open a lot of doors when it comes to your career.

This Chemistry and Mathematics MChem, BSc degree at Leeds will enable you to understand the fundamental concepts of each field alongside a variety of optional modules available, so you can tailor your degree to what really interests you the most. You'll be taught by expert academics, with the unique opportunity to get involved in real-world research happening in the Schools of Chemistry and Mathematics.

You'll have access to world-class research and specialist facilities right here on campus, alongside exciting opportunities like studying abroad and industrial work placements to ensure you have the best grounding to head out into your professional career.

Why study at Leeds:

Benefits of an integrated Masters

Learn more about what an integrated Masters is and how it can benefit your studies and boost your career.

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Course details

On this course, you'll study alongside students on single honours programmes in chemistry and mathematics who are learning the same concepts and reaching the same depth of knowledge as you.

In the first year of this degree, you'll study each subject with equal weighting. As you progress through the programme, you'll have more flexibility to tailor your studies to match your interests, with the option to focus more strongly in either chemistry or mathematics or maintain an equal balance between the two disciplines.

Throughout your time in Leeds, you'll be given guidance and support from academic staff to help plan your studies and subject choices to build a coherent degree programme tailored to your particular talents and interests.

Each academic year, you'll take a total of 120 credits.

Course Structure

The list shown below represents typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our terms and conditions.

Most courses consist of compulsory and optional modules. There may be some optional modules omitted below. This is because they are currently being refreshed to make sure students have the best possible experience. Before you enter each year, full details of all modules for that year will be provided.

For more information and a list of typical modules available on this course, please read Chemistry and Mathematics MChem, BSc in the course catalogue.

Years 1 and 2

In years 1 and 2, you'll cover the essential aspects of both disciplines. Compulsory modules will cover the core of modern mathematics, linear algebra and calculus, alongside the fundamentals of chemistry.

As a core part of your chemistry modules, you’ll have extensive practical sessions in the laboratory, allowing you to perform experiments that reinforce the material taught to you in the lectures.

Year 1 compulsory modules

Introduction to Modern Chemistry – 20 credits

This module will provide a concise introduction to modern chemistry with an initial focus on a qualitative appreciation of electronic structure and how it determines the chemical and structural properties of matter. You’ll also get an introduction to chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, organic structures and mechanisms and the chemistry of transition metal-ligand complexes.

Practical and Research Skills for Chemistry and Maths – 10 credits

Develop practical skills in the teaching labs, undertaking a range of experiments which you’ll then present as scientific reports in different formats. You'll also build invaluable transferable skills in areas like data analysis.

Chemistry in Action: Atoms, Molecules, Matter – 10 credits

This module will build upon the ‘Introduction to Modern Chemistry’ module, exploring areas in structural, physical and inorganic chemistry. On completion of this module, you’ll have an understanding of key sub-disciplines of chemistry including spectroscopy and electronic energy levels, IR and structure determination, periodicity and main-group chemistry, states of matter and phase behaviour and phase equilibria and chromatography.

You’ll also be able to appreciate how these ideas have relevance to modern society through selected illustrative examples and be able to apply these concepts to a range of problems in a linked programme of workshops and tutorials.

Fundamental Organic Chemistry for Biology and Synthesis – 10 credits

Build a broad foundation of knowledge in organic chemistry. You’ll cover the mechanistic basis and application of key organic reactions including nucleophilic and electrophilic substitution and addition reactions, eliminations, oxidation and reduction and key functional group interconversions.

Chemistry of the Material World – 10 credits

Explore both physical and inorganic chemistry, including analysis and understanding of the kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions, molecular energy levels and their origin and transition metal chemistry for materials.

Core Mathematics – 40 credits

You’ll learn the foundational concepts of function, number and proof, equipping you with the language and skills to tackle your mathematical studies. The module also consolidates basic calculus, extending it to more advanced techniques, such as functions of several variables. These techniques lead to methods for solving simple ordinary differential equations. Linear algebra provides a basis for wide areas of mathematics and this module provides the essential foundation.

Probability and Statistics – 20 credits

'Probability is basically common sense reduced to calculation; it makes us appreciate with exactitude what reasonable minds feel by a sort of instinct.' So said Laplace. In the modern scientific and technological world, it is even more important to understand probabilistic and statistical arguments. This module will introduce you to key ideas in both areas, with probability forming the theoretical basis for statistical tests and inference.

Year 2 compulsory modules

You’ll be required to study a minimum of 60 credits in chemistry and 50 credits in maths.

Optional modules

You’ll study optional modules within one of the following chemistry pathways:

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic and Materials Chemistry
  • Physical Chemistry

And choose one of the following maths pathways:

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Statistics and Applied Mathematics

Please note: The modules listed below are indicative of typical options and some of these options may not be available or may be compulsory, depending on other modules you have selected already.

Organic Chemistry

Organic Chemistry: Structure, Reactions and the Science of Life – 20 credits

Examine how the shapes of organic molecules impact their physical properties and reactivity. You'll be introduced to new classes of reactions such as pericyclic reactions and enols/enolates as reactive carbon-centred nucleophiles. You’ll also cover heterocyclic chemistry principles which play a role in biological systems like DNA, enzymes and coenzymes.

Further Practical, Professional and Research Skills for Chemistry and Maths – 20 credits

Gain a deeper understanding of practical and computational chemistry as well as broader transferable skills. You’ll develop further experience of relevant modern laboratory practice, including the recording and analysis of physical measurements, the synthesis and analysis of compounds and the use of advanced mathematics to aid data analysis with relevant chemical applications.

Molecular Signatures: Spectroscopy and Chromatography – 10 credits

Develop the skills to interpret NMR and mass spectra to determine structures of small molecules, building on skills developed in year 1. The module will also provide a theoretical basis for quantitative and qualitative analytical chemistry, in particular analysis by chromatographic methods such as GC and HPLC. 

Compulsory modules – you are required to choose only one of the following

Chemical Kinetics and Thermodynamics – 10 credits

Explore two fundamental parts of physical chemistry, namely chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. The module builds on the concepts of energy storage, states of matter and chemical change introduced in year 1. The module is concerned with the measurement and understanding of the rates and energetics of chemical reactions and illustrated using the context of societally important applications of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, for example atmospheric chemistry and combustion.

Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change – 20 credits

The module has two components. One is concerned with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, illustrated using societally important applications, for example atmospheric chemistry and combustion.

The other component covers quantum mechanics and molecular bonding. Starting from the postulates of quantum mechanics and building from simple models to atoms, to molecules, you’ll learn how and why chemical bonding occurs.

The module builds on concepts of energy storage, states of matter and chemical change.

Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Chemistry of Materials: What They Are and How We Know – 10 credits

Gain an understanding of inorganic solid-state structures and materials and how they are synthesised, characterised and understood. Important characterisation and structure determination techniques will be addressed, with a focus on illustrative examples that highlight structure-property relationships and the importance and diversity of materials applications to be found in everyday life.

Organometallics: From Bonding to Catalysis – 10 credits

Build upon organic and inorganic chemistry learned in year 1, with focus on the structure and reactivity of organo-main group molecules and organo-transition metal complexes, and on the increasingly important application of these species as reagents and/or catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry.

Further Practical, Professional and Research Skills for Chemistry and Maths – 20 credits

Gain a deeper understanding of practical and computational chemistry as well as broader transferable skills. You’ll develop further experience of relevant modern laboratory practice, including the recording and analysis of physical measurements, the synthesis and analysis of compounds and the use of advanced mathematics to aid data analysis with relevant chemical applications.

Molecular Signatures: Spectroscopy and Chromatography – 10 credits

Develop the skills to interpret NMR and mass spectra to determine structures of small molecules, building on skills developed in year 1. The module will also provide a theoretical basis for quantitative and qualitative analytical chemistry, in particular analysis by chromatographic methods such as GC and HPLC. 

Compulsory modules – you are required to choose only one of the following

Chemical Kinetics and Thermodynamics – 10 credits

Explore two fundamental parts of physical chemistry, namely chemical kinetics and thermodynamics. The module builds on the concepts of energy storage, states of matter and chemical change introduced in year 1. The module is concerned with the measurement and understanding of the rates and energetics of chemical reactions and illustrated using the context of societally important applications of chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, for example atmospheric chemistry and combustion.

Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change – 20 credits

The module has two components. One is concerned with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, illustrated using societally important applications, for example atmospheric chemistry and combustion.

The other component covers quantum mechanics and molecular bonding. Starting from the postulates of quantum mechanics and building from simple models to atoms, to molecules, you’ll learn how and why chemical bonding occurs.

The module builds on concepts of energy storage, states of matter and chemical change.

Physical Chemistry

Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change – 20 credits

The module has two components. One is concerned with chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, illustrated using societally important applications, for example atmospheric chemistry and combustion.

The other component covers quantum mechanics and molecular bonding. Starting from the postulates of quantum mechanics and building from simple models to atoms, to molecules, you’ll learn how and why chemical bonding occurs.

The module builds on concepts of energy storage, states of matter and chemical change.

Specialisms in Chemical Science – 10 credits

Gain a deeper understanding of some specialised areas within chemistry, including for example, polymer chemistry, molecular symmetry and spectroscopy and solution equilibria. 

Further Practical, Professional and Research Skills for Chemistry and Maths – 20 credits

Gain a deeper understanding of practical and computational chemistry as well as broader transferable skills. You’ll develop further experience of relevant modern laboratory practice, including the recording and analysis of physical measurements, the synthesis and analysis of compounds and the use of advanced mathematics to aid data analysis with relevant chemical applications.

Molecular Signatures: Spectroscopy and Chromatography – 10 credits

Develop the skills to interpret NMR and mass spectra to determine structures of small molecules, building on skills developed in year 1. The module will also provide a theoretical basis for quantitative and qualitative analytical chemistry, in particular analysis by chromatographic methods such as GC and HPLC. 

Optional modules:

Organometallics: From Bonding to Catalysis – 10 credits

Build upon organic and inorganic chemistry learned in year 1, with focus on the structure and reactivity of organo-main group molecules and organo-transition metal complexes, and on the increasingly important application of these species as reagents and/or catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry.

Applied Mathematics

Vector Calculus and Partial Differential Equations – 20 credits

Vector calculus is the extension of ordinary one-dimensional differential and integral calculus to higher dimensions, and provides the mathematical framework for the study of a wide variety of physical systems, such as fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

These systems give rise to partial differential equations (PDEs), which can be solved and analysed. Students will learn to use, among others, techniques introduced in earlier modules as well as being introduced to Fourier methods for PDEs.

Mathematical Modelling – 20 credits

Learn analytical and computational techniques for the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, which describe particle motion in fields, fluids, waves, diffusion and many other phenomena.

Calculus of Variations – 10 credits

The calculus of variations concerns problems in which one wishes to find the extrema of some quantity over a system that has functional degrees of freedom. Many important problems arise in this way across pure and applied mathematics. In this module, you’ll meet the system of differential equations arising from such variational problems: the Euler-Lagrange equations. These equations, and the techniques for their solution, will be studied in detail.

Optional modules:

Optimisation – 10 credits

Optimisation, “the quest for the best”, plays a major role in financial and economic theory, such as maximising a company's profits or minimising its production costs. This module develops the theory and practice of maximising or minimising a function of many variables, and thus lays a solid foundation for progression onto more advanced topics, such as dynamic optimisation, which are central to the understanding of realistic economic and financial scenarios.

Stochastic Processes – 10 credits

A stochastic process refers to any quantity which changes randomly in time. The capacity of a reservoir, an individual’s level of no claims discount and the size of a population are all examples from the real world. The linking model for all these examples is the Markov process. With appropriate modifications, the Markov process can be extended to model stochastic processes which change over continuous time, not just at regularly spaced time points. You’ll explore the key features of stochastic processes and develop your understanding in areas like state, space and time, the Poisson process and the Markov property.

Statistics and Applied Mathematics

Vector Calculus and Partial Differential Equations – 20 credits

Vector calculus is the extension of ordinary one-dimensional differential and integral calculus to higher dimensions, and provides the mathematical framework for the study of a wide variety of physical systems, such as fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

These systems give rise to partial differential equations (PDEs), which can be solved and analysed. Students will learn to use, among others, techniques introduced in earlier modules as well as being introduced to Fourier methods for PDEs.

Statistical Methods – 20 credits

Statistical models are important in many applications. They contain two main elements: a set of parameters with information of scientific interest and an "error distribution" representing random variation. This module lays the foundations for the analysis of such models. We’ll use practical examples from a variety of statistical applications to illustrate the ideas.

Optional modules – You must chose a minimum of one and a maximum of two options:

Optimisation – 10 credits

Optimisation, “the quest for the best”, plays a major role in financial and economic theory, such as maximising a company's profits or minimising its production costs. This module develops the theory and practice of maximising or minimising a function of many variables, and thus lays a solid foundation for progression onto more advanced topics, such as dynamic optimisation, which are central to the understanding of realistic economic and financial scenarios.

Stochastic Processes – 10 credits

A stochastic process refers to any quantity which changes randomly in time. The capacity of a reservoir, an individual’s level of no claims discount and the size of a population are all examples from the real world. The linking model for all these examples is the Markov process. With appropriate modifications, the Markov process can be extended to model stochastic processes which change over continuous time, not just at regularly spaced time points. You’ll explore the key features of stochastic processes and develop your understanding in areas like state, space and time, the Poisson process and the Markov property.

Calculus of Variations – 10 credits

The calculus of variations concerns problems in which one wishes to find the extrema of some quantity over a system that has functional degrees of freedom. Many important problems arise in this way across pure and applied mathematics. In this module, you’ll meet the system of differential equations arising from such variational problems: the Euler-Lagrange equations. These equations, and the techniques for their solution, will be studied in detail.

Time Series – 10 credits

In time series, measurements are made at a succession of times, and it is the dependence between measurements taken at different times which is important. This module will concentrate on techniques for model identification, parameter estimation, diagnostic checking and forecasting within the autoregressive moving average family of models and their extensions.

Years 3 and 4

During the final years of your course, you can select precisely which modules you wish to study and tailor your programme, so it really matches your interests in chemistry and mathematics. At this point, you also have the option of focusing more strongly on one of the two areas.

In your final year, you'll undertake a major research project in the School of Chemistry, with opportunities to make use of your strong mathematical skills applied to an area of current research interest. During your project, you'll have full use of our research laboratories, working collaboratively with your supervisors, who will be experts in your particular research area.

Year 3 compulsory modules

You’ll choose to do either the following two modules in:

Advanced Chemistry Laboratory for Natural Science and Joint Honours – 20 credits

Build upon your experience in laboratory work, undertaking experimental work, taking into account safety in the chemical lab. You’ll manipulate advanced apparatus and record data for subsequent analysis, synthesis organic and inorganic molecules and determine structure using spectroscopic data.

Project and Research Skills – 20 credits

You’ll perform a review of the scientific literature in a particular area of research. You’ll also acquire, develop and apply research and evaluation skills by undertaking a short project. The module is designed to incorporate key requirements as outlined by the RSC in accreditation of chemistry degree programmes. Projects may be lab-based or non-lab-based / pedagogic.

Or you’ll do the following module instead:

Project in Mathematics – 40 credits

This project is a chance for you to build invaluable research skills and develop and implement a personal training plan by conducting your own independent research project in a topic in mathematics. You’ll meet in groups to discuss the project topic, with each group member researching a specific aspect of the topic and producing an individual project report. You’ll then come together as a group to present your results, with each person contributing their own findings.

Optional modules

You’ll continue on with your pathways chosen in year 2.

Please note: The modules listed below are indicative of typical options and some of these options may not be available or may be compulsory, depending on other modules you have selected already.

Organic Chemistry

Extended Topics in Organic, Bioorganic and Interdisciplinary Chemistry – 30 credits

Explore material such as advanced synthetic methods including use of protecting groups and chemical technologies including flow chemistry and parallel chemistry. You’ll study topics including reactive intermediates, solvent and solvent effects, process optimisation, bio-organic chemistry, synthesis, analysis and commercial application of polymers, and polymeric materials.

Compulsory modules – you are required to choose only one of the following

Quantum Mechanics and Bonding – 10 credits*

Apply the principles of quantum mechanics, building from simple models, to atoms, to molecules. You will learn how and why chemical bonding occurs, and how it impacts our understanding of chemistry.

* You have to take this module if you did not take Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change

Big Data, Big Science – 10 creditsǂ

The explosion of information means that many jobs often require people to handle large datasets efficiently and quickly, yet graduates often don’t have these core skills. In science, new insights often involve taking lots of data and bringing it together in a way that illuminates the problem. Throughout this module, you’ll develop the core skills to efficiently handle large datasets. Using examples from across chemistry, you’ll see how to extract data using simple programming in Python and reach meaningful conclusions. Online tools will help you acquire key skills while weekly seminars will let you explore real examples, enabling you to use these skills to answer scientific questions.

ǂYou have to take this module if you did take Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change

Inorganic Chemistry

Extended Topics in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry – 30 credits

Learn core material such as advanced organometallics and catalysis, including homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. You’ll study topics including, for example, electrochemistry, f-block chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and properties and applications of inorganic solid-state materials.

Compulsory modules – you are required to choose only one of the following

Quantum Mechanics and Bonding – 10 credits*

Apply the principles of quantum mechanics, building from simple models, to atoms, to molecules. You will learn how and why chemical bonding occurs, and how it impacts our understanding of chemistry.

* You have to take this module if you did not take Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change

Big Data, Big Science – 10 creditsǂ

The explosion of information means that many jobs often require people to handle large datasets efficiently and quickly, yet graduates often don’t have these core skills. In science, new insights often involve taking lots of data and bringing it together in a way that illuminates the problem. Throughout this module, you’ll develop the core skills to efficiently handle large datasets. Using examples from across chemistry, you’ll see how to extract data using simple programming in Python and reach meaningful conclusions. Online tools will help you acquire key skills while weekly seminars will let you explore real examples, enabling you to use these skills to answer scientific questions.

ǂYou have to take this module if you did take Molecules, Energy, Quanta and Change

Physical Chemistry

Extended Topics in Physical, Theoretical and Environmental Chemistry – 30 credits

Cover areas in statistical thermodynamics, reaction kinetics and dynamics whilst studying topics like computational and theoretical chemistry, soft matter including amphiphile self-assembly, electronic spectroscopy of atoms and molecules and atmospheric chemistry.

Big Data, Big Science – 10 credits

The explosion of information means that many jobs often require people to handle large datasets efficiently and quickly, yet graduates often don’t have these core skills. In science, new insights often involve taking lots of data and bringing it together in a way that illuminates the problem. Throughout this module, you’ll develop the core skills to efficiently handle large datasets. Using examples from across chemistry, you’ll see how to extract data using simple programming in Python and reach meaningful conclusions. Online tools will help you acquire key skills while weekly seminars will let you explore real examples, enabling you to use these skills to answer scientific questions.

Applied Mathematics

Methods of Applied Mathematics – 20 credits

This module develops techniques to solve ordinary and partial differential equations arising in mathematical physics. For the important case of second-order PDEs, we distinguish between elliptic equations (e.g., Laplace's equation), parabolic equations (e.g., heat equation) and hyperbolic equations (e.g., wave equation), and physically interpret the solutions. When there is not an exact solution in closed form, approximate solutions (so-called perturbation expansions) can be constructed if there is a small or large parameter.

Entropy and Quantum Mechanics – 20 credits

The material world is composed of countless microscopic particles. When three or more particles interact, their dynamics is chaotic, and impossible to predict in detail. Further, at the microscopic atomic-scale particles behave like waves, with dynamics that is known only statistically. So, why is it that the materials around us behave in predictable and regular ways? One reason is that random behaviour on the microscopic scale gives rise to collective behaviour that can be predicted with practical certainty, guided by the principle that the total disorder (or entropy) of the universe never decreases. A second reason is that the mathematics of quantum mechanics provides incredibly accurate predictions at the atomic scale. This module studies calculations involving both entropy and quantum mechanics, as applied to the matter that makes up our world.

Mathematical Biology – 20 credits

Mathematics is increasingly important in biological and medical research. This module aims to introduce you to some areas of mathematical biology and medicine, using tools from applied mathematics.

Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos – 20 credits

Many applications, ranging from biology to physics and engineering, are described by nonlinear dynamical systems, in which a change in output is not proportional to a change in input. Nonlinear dynamical systems can exhibit sudden changes in behaviour as parameters are varied and even unpredictable, chaotic dynamics. This module will provide you with the mathematical tools to analyse nonlinear dynamical systems, including identifying bifurcations and chaotic dynamics.

Fluid Dynamics – 20 credits

Fluid dynamics is the science that describes the motion of materials that flow. It constitutes a significant mathematical challenge with important implications in an enormous range of fields in science and engineering, including aerodynamics, astrophysics, climate modelling, and physiology. This module sets out the fundamental concepts of fluid dynamics, for both inviscid and viscous flows. It includes a formal mathematical description of fluid flow and the derivation of the governing equations, using techniques from vector calculus. Solutions of the governing equations are derived for a range of simple flows, giving you a feel for how fluids behave and experience in modelling everyday phenomena.

Statistics and Applied Mathematics

Methods of Applied Mathematics – 20 credits

This module develops techniques to solve ordinary and partial differential equations arising in mathematical physics. For the important case of second-order PDEs, we distinguish between elliptic equations (e.g., Laplace's equation), parabolic equations (e.g., heat equation) and hyperbolic equations (e.g., wave equation), and physically interpret the solutions. When there is not an exact solution in closed form, approximate solutions (so-called perturbation expansions) can be constructed if there is a small or large parameter.

Statistical Modelling – 20 credits

The standard linear statistical model is powerful but has limitations. In this module, we study several extensions to the linear model which overcome some of these limitations. Generalised linear models allow for different error distributions; additive models allow for nonlinear relationships between predictors and the response variable; and survival models are needed to study data where the response variable is the time taken for an event to occur.

Entropy and Quantum Mechanics – 20 credits

The material world is composed of countless microscopic particles. When three or more particles interact, their dynamics is chaotic, and impossible to predict in detail. Further, at the microscopic atomic-scale particles behave like waves, with dynamics that is known only statistically. So, why is it that the materials around us behave in predictable and regular ways? One reason is that random behaviour on the microscopic scale gives rise to collective behaviour that can be predicted with practical certainty, guided by the principle that the total disorder (or entropy) of the universe never decreases. A second reason is that the mathematics of quantum mechanics provides incredibly accurate predictions at the atomic scale. This module studies calculations involving both entropy and quantum mechanics, as applied to the matter that makes up our world.

Mathematical Biology – 20 credits

Mathematics is increasingly important in biological and medical research. This module aims to introduce you to some areas of mathematical biology and medicine, using tools from applied mathematics.

Multivariate Analysis and Classification – 20 credits

Multivariate datasets are common: it is typical that experimental units are measured for more than one variable at a time. This module extends univariate statistical techniques for continuous data to a multivariate setting and introduces methods designed specifically for multivariate data analysis (cluster analysis, principal component analysis, multidimensional scaling and factor analysis). A particular problem of classification arises when the multivariate observations need to be used to divide the data into groups or “classes”.

Year 4 compulsory modules

Interdisciplinary project for Joint Honours – 45 credits

Complete a major interdisciplinary research project that brings together the skills and expertise from your two major subject areas studied in your programme. You’ll gain independent research skills in the design, planning, execution and reporting of a novel piece of interdisciplinary research.

Optional modules

Please note: The modules listed below are indicative of typical options and some of these options may not be available or may be compulsory, depending on other modules you have selected already.

Advanced Topics in Chemistry – 30 credits

You’ll have a broad understanding of core areas of advanced chemistry and be able to solve unseen problem-led questions in these areas. You’ll also be able to access the primary literature and use your knowledge to make a critical evaluation of this information, developing transferable skills to aid your future career.

Advanced Topics in Chemistry for Natural Sciences and Joint Honours – 45 credits

Gain an advanced level of understanding in pertinent topics of current research/commercial interest, so you can navigate and utilise the intersections between chemistry and other disciplines to suggest solutions to real-world problems. The module is designed to prepare you for research either in academia or industry.

Statistical Theory – 15 credits

This module gives a general unified theory of the problems of estimation and hypotheses testing. It covers Bayesian inference, making comparisons with classical inference.

Statistical Computing – 15 credits

Statistical computing is the branch of mathematics that concerns the use of computational techniques for situations that either directly involve randomness, or where randomness is used as part of a mathematical model. This module gives an overview of the foundations and basic methods in statistical computing.

Evolutionary Modelling – 15 credits

Darwin’s natural selection theory is a cornerstone of modern science. Recently, mathematical and computational modelling has led to significant advances in our understanding of evolutionary puzzles, such as what determines biodiversity or the origin of cooperative behaviour. On this module, you will be exposed to fundamental ideas of evolutionary modelling, and to the mathematical tools needed to pursue their study. These will be illustrated by numerous examples motivated by exciting developments in mathematical biology.

Advanced Mathematical Methods – 15 credits

Many real-world problems can be modelled by ordinary or partial differential equations or formulated as a complicated integral. In this module, advanced techniques are developed to solve such problems and interpret their solutions, motivated by examples from mathematical physics, continuum mechanics, and mathematical biology. These techniques include so-called asymptotic methods, which yield approximate solutions if the problem contains a small or large parameter.

Astrophysical and Geophysical Fluids – 15 credits

This module concerns mathematical modelling of various phenomena observed in astrophysical and geophysical flows, meaning those in planetary and stellar atmospheres and interiors. The focus is on understanding key dynamical processes in such flows, including those due to rotation and density stratification and, in many astrophysical flows, the electrical conductivity of the fluid (which can thus support a magnetic field). These effects lead to various interesting waves and instabilities, with physical and observational significance.

Advanced Statistical Modelling – 15 credits

This module builds on statistical models introduced in earlier studies, developing advanced techniques for analysis of datasets. These include methods for estimating the probability density function from a data set and approaches to constraining the number of variables that contribute to a linear model.

Environmental and Industrial Flows – 15 credits

Many flows found in nature such as avalanches and glaciers or in industrial applications such as 3D printing and coatings involve complex fluids, whose properties can be very different from those of simple Newtonian fluids like air and water. This course gives an introduction into the often-surprising behaviour of these fluids and how they can be modelled mathematically using differential equations.

Classical and Quantum Hamiltonian Systems – 15 credits

The Hamiltonian formulation of dynamics is the most mathematically beautiful form of mechanics and a stepping stone to quantum mechanics. Hamiltonian systems are conservative dynamical systems with a very interesting algebraic and geometric structure: the Poisson bracket. Hamilton's equations are invariant under a very wide class of transformations and this leads to a number of powerful solution techniques.

One-year optional work placement or study abroad

During your course, you’ll be given the opportunity to advance your skill set and experience further. You can apply to either work in a one-year industrial placement or study abroad for a year, choosing from a selection of universities we’re in partnership with worldwide.

Learning and teaching

As a chemistry and mathematics student at Leeds, we ensure that you benefit from a wide range of teaching methods, including lectures, workshops, small group tutorials and computational and practical laboratory work.

Laboratory classes and project work allows you to gain first-hand experience investigating and applying material from your lectures and tutorials to real-life situations. Together, they will equip you with in-depth knowledge, key practical skills and transferable skills that will help you secure a graduate job. Our close links with industry also mean that you have direct contact with industry and potential employers from an early stage in your course.

You’ll be assigned a personal tutor to guide you through your studies, and you'll receive support from fellow students through our peer mentoring scheme. Peer mentors are students who are on your course, but are in years 2, 3 or 4. They’ll help you when you arrive at University and throughout your first year. You’ll meet your peer mentors during your first week for a social activity.

Taster lectures

Watch our taster lectures to get a flavour of what it’s like to study at Leeds:

On this course you’ll be taught by our expert academics, from lecturers through to professors. You may also be taught by industry professionals with years of experience, as well as trained postgraduate researchers, connecting you to some of the brightest minds on campus.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by more than one component. Components can include examinations, assignments, written reports, presentations and oral discussions throughout the programme, which will build up your skills in these areas.

The types of assessment used for each module aim to measure the learning outcomes we want you to achieve. Although formal end-of-semester examinations are predominant, often accounting for 80% or more of the formal assessment, many modules include a significant coursework element. You are also continuously assessed through practical work.

In your final year, alongside assessed theory modules, you’ll perform a major research project under the guidance of a member of academic staff, which will contribute to the final mark you are awarded.

Entry requirements

A-level: AAA including Chemistry and Mathematics.

Where an A-Level Science subject is taken, we require a pass in the practical science element, alongside the achievement of the A-Level at the stated grade.

Excludes A-Level General Studies or Critical Thinking.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and International Project Qualification (IPQ): We recognise the value of these qualifications and the effort and enthusiasm that applicants put into them, and where an applicant offers an A in the EPQ or IPQ we may make an offer of AAB at A-Level.

GCSE: GCSE: English Language grade C (4) and Mathematics grade B (6) or above, or an appropriate English language and Mathematics qualification. We will accept Level 2 Functional Skills English in lieu of GCSE English. 

Alternative qualification

Access to HE Diploma

Normally only accepted in combination with grade A in A Level Mathematics or equivalent.

BTEC

BTEC qualifications in relevant disciplines are considered in combination with other qualifications, including grade A in A-level mathematics, or equivalent

Cambridge Pre-U

D3 D3 M2 in 3 principal subjects including Chemistry and D3 Mathematics

International Baccalaureate

17 at Higher Level including 6 in Higher Level Chemistry and Mathematics

Irish Leaving Certificate (higher Level)

H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 H2 including Higher Level Chemistry and Mathematics

Scottish Highers / Advanced Highers

Suitable combinations of Scottish Higher and Advanced Highers are acceptable, though Chemistry and Mathematics must be presented at Advanced Higher level. Typically AB at Advanced Higher and AABBB at Higher Level including Chemistry and A in Mathematics at Advanced Higher.

Read more about UK and Republic of Ireland accepted qualifications or contact the School’s Undergraduate Admissions Team.

Alternative entry

We’re committed to identifying the best possible applicants, regardless of personal circumstances or background.

Access to Leeds is a contextual admissions scheme which accepts applications from individuals who might be from low income households, in the first generation of their immediate family to apply to higher education, or have had their studies disrupted.

Find out more about Access to Leeds and contextual admissions.

Typical Access to Leeds A Level offer: ABB including Chemistry and A in Mathematics and pass Access to Leeds. For alternative qualification offers please contact the admissions team.

Foundation years 

If you do not have the formal qualifications for immediate entry to one of our degrees, you may be able to progress through a foundation year.  

We offer a Studies in Science with Foundation Year BSc for students without science and mathematics qualifications. 

You could also study our Interdisciplinary Science with Foundation Year BSc which is for applicants whose background is less represented at university.  

On successful completion of your foundation year, you will be able to progress onto your chosen course. 

International

We accept a range of international equivalent qualifications. For more information, please contact the Admissions Team.

International Foundation Year

International students who do not meet the academic requirements for undergraduate study may be able to study the University of Leeds International Foundation Year. This gives you the opportunity to study on campus, be taught by University of Leeds academics and progress onto a wide range of Leeds undergraduate courses. Find out more about International Foundation Year programmes.

English language requirements

IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in any one component. For other English qualifications, read English language equivalent qualifications.


Improve your English
If you're an international student and you don't meet the English language requirements for this programme, you may be able to study our undergraduate pre-sessional English course, to help improve your English language level.

Fees

UK: To be confirmed

International: To be confirmed

Tuition fees for UK undergraduate students starting in 2024/25
Tuition fees for UK full-time undergraduate students are set by the UK Government and will be £9,250 for students starting in 2024/25.

The fee may increase in future years of your course in line with inflation only, as a consequence of future changes in Government legislation and as permitted by law.

Tuition fees for UK undergraduate students starting in 2025/26
Tuition fees for UK full-time undergraduate students starting in 2025/26 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. When the fee is available we will update individual course pages.

Tuition fees for international undergraduate students starting in 2024/25 and 2025/26
Tuition fees for international students for 2024/25 are available on individual course pages. Fees for students starting in 2025/26 will be available from September 2024.

Tuition fees for a study abroad or work placement year
If you take a study abroad or work placement year, you’ll pay a reduced tuition fee during this period. For more information, see Study abroad and work placement tuition fees and loans.

Read more about paying fees and charges.

Additional cost information

The University will provide you with personal protective equipment, including safety glasses and a lab coat, and laboratory notebooks you’ll need to undertake laboratory work. You’ll also have access to a vast supply of books, academic journals and periodicals from the university libraries however you may wish to purchase some books that are recommended on the course.

This course requires work using a range of relevant software which is provided by the university. We also use a blended learning model where you’ll need to access course materials and video conferences using a computer or mobile device (e.g. laptop, tablet, smartphone).

You’ll have access to the extensive IT facilities on campus including 24/7 computer clusters with everything you need to complete your work however you may wish to purchase your own computer.

There may be additional costs related to your course or programme of study, or related to being a student at the University of Leeds. Read more on our living costs and budgeting page.

Scholarships and financial support

If you have the talent and drive, we want you to be able to study with us, whatever your financial circumstances. There is help for students in the form of loans and non-repayable grants from the University and from the government. Find out more in our Undergraduate funding overview.

Applying

Apply to this course through UCAS. Check the deadline for applications on the UCAS website.

Apply to this course and check the deadline for applications through the UCAS website.

We may consider applications submitted after the deadline. Availability of courses in UCAS Extra will be detailed on UCAS at the appropriate stage in the cycle.

Admissions guidance

Read our admissions guidance about applying and writing your personal statement.

What happens after you’ve applied

You can keep up to date with the progress of your application through UCAS.

UCAS will notify you when we make a decision on your application. If you receive an offer, you can inform us of your decision to accept or decline your place through UCAS.

How long will it take to receive a decision

We typically receive a high number of applications to our courses. For applications submitted by the January UCAS deadline, UCAS asks universities to make decisions by mid-May at the latest.

Offer holder events

If you receive an offer from us, you’ll be invited to an offer holder event. This event is more in-depth than an open day. It gives you the chance to learn more about your course and get your questions answered by academic staff and students. Plus, you can explore our campus, facilities and accommodation.

International applicants

International students apply through UCAS in the same way as UK students.

We recommend that international students apply as early as possible to ensure that they have time to apply for their visa.

Read about visas, immigration and other information here.

If you’re unsure about the application process, contact the admissions team for help.

Admissions policy

University of Leeds Admissions Policy 2025

This course is taught by

School of Chemistry
School of Mathematics

Contact us

School of Chemistry Undergraduate Admissions

Email: chmadmis@leeds.ac.uk
Telephone:

Career opportunities

The employment opportunities available to you with a joint honours degree in chemistry and mathematics are extensive across numerous industries, with the potential to take you all over the world.

Plus, University of Leeds students are among the top 5 most targeted by top employers according to The Graduate Market 2024, High Fliers Research, meaning our graduates are highly sought after by some of the most reputable companies in the field.

Qualifying with a degree in chemistry and mathematics from Leeds will set you up with the core foundations you need to pursue an exciting career in a wide range of sectors, including:

  • Energy
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Finance
  • Environment
  • Food and drink
  • Engineering and manufacturing
  • Technology
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Scientific research and development
  • Legal

The breadth of knowledge and experience, along with the teamwork, problem solving, research, communication and IT skills taught on the course are widely transferable and desirable to a whole host of employers.

Here’s an insight into the job roles some of our graduates in chemistry and mathematics have obtained:

  • Case Handler, Capita
  • Partner, Holeys Chartered Accountants
  • Finance Manager and Business Controller, Nynas UK AB
  • Whole School Assistant, Sheffield City Council
  • Research Group, University of Liverpool
  • Director, Bennett Brooks & Co. Limited

Read profiles of our alumni to find out more about where some of our graduates are working.

Careers support

At Leeds, we help you to prepare for your future from day one. Our Leeds for Life initiative is designed to help you develop and demonstrate the skills and experience you need for when you graduate. We will help you to access opportunities across the University and record your key achievements so you are able to articulate them clearly and confidently.

You'll be supported throughout your studies by our dedicated Employability team, who will provide you with specialist support and advice to help you find relevant work experience, internships and industrial placements, as well as graduate positions. You’ll benefit from timetabled employability sessions, support during internships and placements, and presentations and workshops delivered by employers.

You'll also have full access to the University’s Careers Centre, which is one of the largest in the country.

Study abroad and work placements

Study abroad

Studying abroad is a unique opportunity to explore the world, whilst gaining invaluable skills and experience that could enhance your future employability and career prospects too.

From Europe to Asia, the USA to Australasia, we have many University partners worldwide you can apply to, spanning across some of the most popular destinations for students.

This optional programme offers you the chance to spend time abroad as an extra academic year and will extend your studies by 12 months. You'll return to Leeds to complete your final year of study.

Once you’ve successfully completed your year abroad, you'll be awarded the ‘international’ variant in your degree title which demonstrates your added experience to future employers.

Find out more at the Study Abroad website.

Work placements

A placement year is a great way to help you decide on a career path when you graduate. You’ll develop your skills and gain a real insight into working life in a particular company or sector. It will also help you to stand out in a competitive graduate jobs market and improve your chances of securing the career you want.

Benefits of a work placement year:

  • 100+ organisations to choose from, both in the UK and overseas
  • Build industry contacts within your chosen field
  • Our close industry links mean you’ll be in direct contact with potential employers
  • Advance your experience and skills by putting the course teachings into practice
  • Gain invaluable insight into working as a professional in this industry
  • Improve your employability

If you decide to undertake a placement year, this will extend your period of study by 12 months and, on successful completion, you'll be awarded the ‘industrial’ variant in your degree title to demonstrate your added experience to future employers.

With the help and support of our dedicated Employability team, you can find the right placement to suit you and your future career goals.

Find out more about Industrial placements.

Student profile: Ruby Robinson

I'm really happy that I chose to do the joint honours because it's allowed me to pick my own direction and figure out what I wanted to do.
Find out more about Ruby Robinson's time at Leeds