Biomedical Sciences BSc

Year of entry

2024 course information

Open Days 2024

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UCAS code
B100
Start date
September 2025
Delivery type
On campus
Duration
3 years full time
Work placement
Optional
Study abroad
Optional
Typical A-level offer
AAB (specific subject requirements)
Typical Access to Leeds offer
BBB
Full entry requirements
Accredited
Yes

Course overview

Student in the lab looking at a microscope

Become an expert in biomedical sciences; a rapidly-growing area developing solutions to a range of challenges linked to maintaning health and wellbeing at each stage of life. You’ll gain an integrated knowledge of the human body; how its organs, tissues and cells work together to keep you healthy, and what goes wrong in disease.

Explore cutting-edge research in areas such as regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, drug discovery, cancer biology and dementia. You will be part of an engaging learning experience, informed by our research and delivered by world-leading academics.

Staff in our school are leaders in disciplines of biomedical sciences. These cover anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, neuroscience, biochemistry and microbiology, with many working in conjunction with other disciplines such as medical engineering, advanced materials science, computing and robotics.

Our focus will be on preparing you for the workplace.. You’ll undertake an independent capstone or culminating research project, bringing together the knowledge, skills and attributes developed throughout your degree.

This 3-year BSc can also be converted into an integrated Masters (MBiol) with an optional additional year of specialist training, subject to suitable academic performance and availability. You would study advanced research topics and undertake your own extended research project within one of the major research laboratories in the School of Biomedical Sciences or an appropriate period of work based practice.

Course highlights

  • Designed to give a broad scientific foundation and key graduate skills for those interested in biomedical sciences.
  • Explore cutting-edge biomedical research delivered by world-leading researchers.
  • Delivered using inspirational, engaging and inclusive approaches. Develop the key skills and attributes you will need to become one of the next generation of thinkers, innovators and leaders, equipped to make a positive difference in a complex and ever-changing interconnected world.
  • Across the first two years of the course, experimental skills modules teach you to identify problems, and to design and conduct experiments to find answers to key biomedical questions.
  • The opportunity to undertake an independent capstone research project under the supervision of a field-leading academic, further developing key skills and attributes that will set you apart in both the competitive graduate job market and/or when seeking to commence a PhD.

Wellbeing and support

The University of Leeds features an extensive network of excellent services dedicated to you and your wellbeing. We are here to help throughout your time in higher education, ensuring you have everything you need to succeed. For more information on the different facets of support you will have access to, please see our Wellbeing and Support page.

Wellbeing afternoons

Here at the University of Leeds, we are acutely aware that teaching is only part of a healthy, engaging university lifestyle. Activities which contribute to your wellbeing are vital, and so we have created Wednesday Wellbeing Afternoons.

These afternoons are a period of time with as much teaching as possible removed to give you the chance to pursue your passions. This may be a competitive sport for the university, a social sporting activity, or indeed any activity which contributes to positive mental health. We want your degree to be as flexible as possible so that you can make the most of your time here with us.

Flexible degrees

Biomedical sciences is a broad-based degree within the School of Biomedical Sciences, which provides significant flexibility to choose what you wish to study.

Some of our programmes share a common first year which means that at the end of year 1, there are opportunities to transfer on to other suitable and related degree courses, subject to approval. Additional degree courses may be available depending on your academic background.

Accreditation

Accredited by The Royal Society of Biology

The BSc Biomedical Sciences (Industrial) variant of this course is accredited by The Royal Society of Biology.

Advanced Degree Accreditation by the Society recognises academic excellence in the biosciences, and highlights degrees that educate the research and development leaders and innovators of the future. The Advanced Accreditation criteria require evidence that graduates from the programme meet defined sets of learning outcomes, including gaining a substantial period of research experience.

This accreditation is also applicable to the following course variants: MBiol Biomedical Sciences; MBiol Biomedical Sciences (Industrial); MBiol Biomedical Sciences (International).

Course details

Modules

The list shown below represents typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our terms and conditions.

Most courses consist of compulsory and optional modules. There may be some optional modules omitted below. This is because they are currently being refreshed to make sure students have the best possible experience. Before you enter each year, full details of all modules for that year will be provided.

For more information and a list of typical modules available on this course, please read BSc Biomedical Sciences in the course catalogue.

Year 1

In year 1, you will be provided with an enhanced knowledge and understanding of the principal body systems, processes and functions in health and disease, and gain hands-on practical experience of the experimental approaches used to generate this knowledge.

You’ll be introduced to a range of topics across the biomedical sciences, including essential anatomy & physiology of human systems, biochemistry of the cell, microbiology, pharmacology, and neuroscience. This is delivered in a structured and facilitated way to support your learning.

Should you be interested in Biomedical Sciences but do not yet want to decide on a specialisation, the first year of this course will equip you with the comprehensive foundation knowledge and transferable skills needed to take on more specialised topics in later years.

You’ll also develop the fundamental practical laboratory skills and techniques that will underpin the rest of your studies. This is in addition to essential academic and professional skills to help you progress successfully through the course and into further study or employment.

At the end of year 1, our flexible degree structure may offer you the opportunity to transfer onto other suitable, related degree courses within the School of Biomedical Sciences, subject to suitable academic performance and availability.

Compulsory modules

Team-Based Solutions for Local Challenges in Human Sciences (20 credits) - This module allows you address a health-related challenges in a facilitated team-based environment. It will be related to your specific course of study, and help you develop the core skills you need to address the challenge. What you learn will align with content in other first-year modules.

Practical application of Clinical, Laboratory and Field Skills for Human Sciences (20 credits) - This module introduces the key skills for scientific research into sports, human physiology, neuroscience and pharmacology. You will take part in hands-on application of these skills, spending time in both laboratories and the field. You will also develop supporting skills such as research design, scientific writing and data analysis.

Structure and Function of Human Body Systems - This module introduces you to the structure and function of the systems in the human body. You'll focus on how these systems interact with each other, and learn how they can be disturbed by outside factors such as exercise, disease and our environment.

The Basis of Life - This module helps you to better understand the complexity of life on Earth, by exploring the fundamental process that support it. You'll explore the structure and function of cells, energy metabolism and how cells develop, with a look at microbes, plants and animals as you go. You'll see how important a multidisciplinary approach is to this topic, with biology, biochemistry, mathematics and physics all having a role to play in this field.
Biology of the Mind - This module introduces you to key concepts in neuroscience, using examples drawn from across the human nervous system. You'll also explore how we study the nervous system's structure and function, at the cellular, circuit and network level.

Introduction to Pharmacology - In this module, you'll be introduced to the foundational concepts of pharmacology. These will be explained to you through examples drawn from different areas of the field, such as drugs used to treat common diseases and conditions. You'll also learn how we discover and develop drugs within today's pharmaceutical industry.

Evidence Based Reports (Assessment – BMS) (30 credits) - This module covers two assignments. The first assesses how well you connect different concepts discussed on the course, along with how well you explain things like structure, function and homeostasis. The second examines your understanding of things such as clinical pharmacology, the discovery and development of drugs, and how we experimentally measure things like structure and function.

Application of Knowledge (Assessment - BMS) (30 credits) - This module sees you explaining various topics that you’ve explored on the course so far. You will take an in-course assessment, write two reflective essays and sit an exam.

Optional modules

20 credits from the following, at least one module from basket 1

Basket 1

Candidates will be required to study a minimum of 20 credits but up to 40 credits of optional modules:

Introduction to Immunology (10 credits) - You’ll review fundamental immune mechanisms with a particular emphasis on human immunology and its relationship to health and disease. You will discover how we protect ourselves from infection through our immune defences, and learn about the role of different types of leukocytes and antibodies and complement in our immune defences.

The Microbial World (10 credits) - You’ll be introduced to a wide range of microscopic life forms and viruses, giving you a sound introduction to Microbiology and exploring the diversity of microbial life with emphasis on how we interact with microbes that are responsible for infections as well as those that do not normally cause disease. You will learn how microorganisms interact with each other and how they influence the lives of more complex organisms, for good or ill and will learn how fungi, bacteria and viruses are observed and manipulated safely.

Introduction to Genetics (10 credits) - You’ll be provided with essential foundational knowledge in genetics, exploring the different meanings of ‘genetics’ and how this concept has changed over time. More importantly, you will explore what genetics means for us as organisms. To what extent do genes determine our inheritance? And how do our genes make us the distinct and unique organisms we are?

If only one module is selected from basket 1, choose an optional module from basket 2

Basket 2

Candidates can study up to 20 credits from the following list of optional modules:

Elements of Human Nutrition (10 credits) - You’ll be introduced to the underpinning physiological processes that govern health such as nutrient function and metabolism, dietary intakes and food sources, deficiency diseases and nutritional requirements. You’ll too look apply nutritional recommendations within the context of health and special populations.

Discovery Module (10 credits) - As well as the compulsory and optional modules that make up your programme of study, you may be able to choose something different to your main subject as a Discovery Module.

Year 2

You will gain a more detailed exposure to the systems, processes or functions of the body in areas of key research at Leeds through core and optional modules. In year 2, there is more choice in the topics you may choose allowing you to tailor your degree.

Modules are taught using an integrated method that brings together normal structure and function, with changes in disease and treatment. Advanced biomedical science concept units include aspects of cardiovascular sciences, molecular pharmacology, neurobiology, and regenerative medicine.

In year 2 the modules are taught via facilitated and independent learning. You’ll have a range of optional modules to choose from, including human diseases, molecular neuroscience, bioinformatics, or tissue engineering, and develop your understanding of research methods and your experimental skills.

You will further develop your personal and professional skills including critical thinking, creative problem solving, team-working, and critical reasoning skills. You’ll then be given the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills to evaluate scientific evidence and create solutions to biomedical problems.

At the end of year 2 you will have the opportunity to complete an industrial work placement, study abroad, or combined study and work abroad. This will add an additional year of study to your degree.

Compulsory modules

Team-Based Solutions to Global Challenges in Human Science (20 credits) – In line with key complex global challenges related to UN sustainability goals (United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) | Sustainability (leeds.ac.uk)), you will build skills in knowledge application, analysis, and scientific data presentation. You’ll work as a team to research and create biomedical solutions to a global grand challenge or UN SDG. You will develop and practice key academic and professional skills including the critical analysis of research papers, verbal, written and graphical communication, team-working, planning and organisation, and negotiation.

Advanced Concepts in Biomedical Sciences (40 credits) – This module introduces advanced concepts underpinning the study of Biomedical Sciences. This will include cardiac, circulatory and respiratory physiology, effects of disease, impact exercise has on these systems. The drug discovery process as well as neuroanatomy and cellular neuroscience. This content builds on topics covered in year 1 of the programme.

Optional modules

Candidates will be required to study the one of the following 4 modules (all pass for progression):

Experimental Skills in Medical Sciences (20 credits) – The module will provide students with opportunities to further develop their experimental, technical and computational skills. Working in teams, they will plan and carry out a range of practical activities, including laboratory-based experimental projects and computational work. Students will explore principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing and develop more advanced skills in data evaluation using statistical methods. The module will also focus on dissemination of experimental findings using written reports and other communication formats.

Experimental Skills in Pharmacology (20 credits) – The module will provide students with opportunities to further develop their experimental, technical and computational skills. Working in teams, they will plan and carry out a range of practical activities, including laboratory-based experimental projects and computational work. Students will explore principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing and develop more advanced skills in data evaluation using statistical methods. The module will also focus on dissemination of experimental findings using written reports and other communication formats.

Experimental Skills in Neuroscience (20 credits) – The module will provide students with opportunities to further develop their experimental, technical and computational skills. Working in teams, they will plan and carry out a range of practical activities, including laboratory-based experimental projects and computational work. Students will explore principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing and develop more advanced skills in data evaluation using statistical methods. The module will also focus on dissemination of experimental findings using written reports and other communication formats.

Experimental Skills in Human Physiology, Physical Activity and Health (20 credits) – The module will provide students with opportunities to further develop their experimental, technical and computational skills. Working in teams, they will plan and carry out a range of practical activities, including laboratory-based experimental projects and computational work. Students will explore principles of experimental design, hypothesis testing and develop more advanced skills in data evaluation using statistical methods. The module will also focus on dissemination of experimental findings using written reports and other communication formats.

Basket 1: Candidates will be required to study a minimum of 20 credits but up to 40 credits of optional modules:

The Imprinted Brain (10 credits) -The course is based on the 2009 book by Christopher Badcock, “The Imprinted Brain”. In it, Badcock proposes that imprinted genes (parental genes that can be expressed in their offspring in favour of those of the other parent) determine our position on a spectrum of behavioural qualities between autism and psychosis. Students will be expected to apply an interdisciplinary approach to investigate the genetics, pathology, socio-economic costs and cultural differences associated with these disorders. The course will be run by Utrecht University in collaboration with University of Leeds and will involve distance learning in mixed teams of students from both universities.

Sensory and Motor Neuroscience (10 credits) - This module explores the anatomy and physiology of sensory and motor systems, as well as integration across different systems. Some aspects of this module will be framed in the context of disorders and conditions that alter sensory and motor functions. This content builds on topics covered in Year 1 of the programme, as well as integrating the neuroanatomy and cellular neuroscience covered in Semester 1 of Year 2.

Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Essentials (10 credits) - This module introduces the interdisciplinary field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The need for and challenges of tissue engineering will be covered, along with the fundamentals of immunology and transplantation, tissue and matrix biology, biomaterials and cellular interactions, in vitro and in vivo models. This will be taught by lectures and an interactive workshop.

Applied Concepts in Drug Development (20 credits) - This module explores the preclinical and clinical processes involved in evaluating whether optimised lead compounds (or other drug types) are likely to be safe and efficacious as a drug. The preclinical stages include evaluating drug efficacy and ADME in in vitro assays and in vivo, in animal disease models. More recent developments have involved human stem cell-derived tissue models and the use of non-mammalian disease models. The module will also cover the stages of clinical trials. Learners will also acquire knowledge of the legal and regulatory aspects associated with the protection, marketing, and monitoring of a drug that has been approved for clinical use.

Medical Immunology (10 credits) - You’ll gain detailed knowledge of the immune system, focusing on human health, from infectious and auto-immune diseases to treatment.

Basket 2: Candidates can study up to 20 credits from the following list of optional modules:

Chemotherapy (10 credits) - The basis of chemotherapy is selective toxicity, the use of agents to kill or suppress the growth of invading cells or infective organisms. This module will help you understand how these agents work. You will learn about the drugs used to treat cancer, bacterial, fungal and viral infections. In addition, immunosuppressant drugs and the chemotherapy of protozoal diseases such as malaria will also be discussed.

Medical Virology (10 credits) - You’ll be introduced to techniques used for the study of viruses, the structure of viruses and the processes of their replication and evolution. You will also learn how virus biology can be exploited for gene expression and gene therapy.

Medical Bacteriology (10 credits) - This module provides a detailed introduction to the types of human disease caused by bacterial pathogens. Students will learn about how bacteria cause disease, types of disease and treatment of bacterial infections.

Introduction to Bioinformatics (10 credits) - You’ll be introduced to the basics of bioinformatics and the application of bioinformatics to many biological questions. The module shows how genomic data is stored and accessed to learn about any characterised gene or protein and how it links to resources on research. The approaches to modern phylogenetics are introduced and how bioinformatics is applied to drug discovery.

Human Diseases (10 credits) - You will cover a range of human diseases, both inherited and environmentally linked. These include heart and vascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, dermatitis, and diseases linked to diet deficiencies.

Biological Membranes and Cell Signalling (10 credits) - How does a cell maintain an internal environment essential for life processes? - How do conflicting biological functions occur simultaneously within the same cell? - How does the cell overcome the permeability barrier of its membranes to let vital substances in and out? - How do cells tell each other their biological condition and respond to environmental signals?The answers to these fundamental questions in biology will be explained in this module.The main objectives of this module are to explain: (1) the structure, function and dynamic nature of membranes and why these properties are crucial to living systems(2) the characteristics of the transport systems found in membranes(3) the chemical messengers used by cells to signal between themselves and the mechanisms used to perceive and respond to these messengers.

Candidates wishing to select a discovery module as part of basket 2 should consider the modules presented here:

Skills in Communicating Research Beyond the University (10 credits) - This module will allow you to develop your skills in communicating current research to selected audiences from outside the University. Within academia we are trained in writing and presenting to colleagues and peers, but little about communicating research at an appropriate level, and in an interesting way, to an audience group from the general public. This module will enable you to develop key skills that both graduate employers and the research community are looking for. You will be able to design, and implement effectively, appropriate activities to communicate the research to a general audience. The skills covered will include an overview of aims and purposes of engaging a wider audience, event management, marketing, communication, role of the media, funding, what makes quality public engagement, skills for effective partnership, working with museums, understanding your audience, using social media to engage, ethics and evaluation for impact. These are all key skills which will make you competitive, and help you succeed in the global research and employment market. This is a discovery module, open to all students, emphasising the link between research and student education. Working in partnership across the University:Students will be working with networks and services across the institution (e.g. Sustainability, Student Volunteering, Digital Team, Alumni, Educational Engagement and Communications, Employability Officers, Engagement Champions, Outreach Fellows and the University’s Public Engagement Network members) and in consultation with other Institutions, to learn from best practice.

Nutrition in the Prevention of Disease (10 credits) - awaiting module description

Year 3

The focal point for year 3 is an independent capstone research project that you’ll carry out under the supervision of a field-leading academic. Here you will be able to select from a wide range of project types, enabling you to focus on a subject of specific interest, developing the skills required for your future career.

Examples of previous projects are:

  • Biocompatibility evaluation of novel regenerative devices: in vitro cytotoxicity testing.
  • Rapid point-of-care tests for disease diagnosis or management.
  • Systematic Review of ‘metabolic disorders: a modern epidemic'
  • The challenges facing drug discovery and development in Uganda: Evidence driven report with recommendations.

Alongside your capstone research project, you will choose specialised topic modules. Select from a menu of different research topics focused on your areas of interest and led by world leading researchers. Topics include cancer biology, Alzheimer’s disease, neuroplasticity, STEM cells and many more.

Compulsory modules

Specialised Topics in Biomedical Sciences I (20 credits) – You’ll have the opportunity to build your knowledge of research in specific topic areas led by active researchers in the field of study. It will introduce you to a range of research topics in the broad field of biomedical sciences and develop your ability to collate, critically analyse, and describe scientific information. Topics covered will reflect current research interests of the School, and may include, for example, cancer biology, diabetes or Alzheimer’s disease.

Specialised Topics in Biomedical Sciences I (20 credits) – You’ll further build your knowledge of research specific topic areas led by active researchers in the field of study. You’ll be introduced to a range of research topics in the broad field of biomedical sciences and develop your ability to collate, critically analyse, and describe scientific information. Topics covered will reflect current research interests of the School, and may focus on, for example, the molecular basis for neurological conditions such as autism and epilepsy, and stem cell technologies.

Advanced Skills (20 credits) – You’ll attend a series of compulsory and optional units designed to provide scaffolding and support for your capstone research experience. This will develop and utilise your research, employability and 4th Industrial Revolution skills required both for the capstone project and for the workplace. You’ll select the units which develop key skills and attributes required for your individual capstone project and/or future employment. The assignments for this module provide further scaffolding and support for the creation of your capstone project.

Capstone Research Project (40 credits) – You’ll design and undertake, either individually or as part of a team, an extended enquiry-based project in an area or topic relevant to the biomedical sciences. This project could be one of many formats including scientific research, public engagement, grand challenges report, or the development of educational resources. This will allow you to apply new knowledge and skills gained in earlier years of the programme, acquire new understanding, and develop new research and employability skills. You’ll communicate the outcomes or outputs of your project in different ways to a variety of audiences. Students may choose the capstone project or format of interest to them, being mentored by one of the leading academics in that field of study.

Learning and teaching

Our teaching is delivered through a combination of large and small group workshops and practicals. We take a student-centred approach to learning and so our teaching is designed to enable student engagement through active learning approaches that include creative problem-solving, team-work activities and mini-projects. In this way, you are able to apply the theoretical knowledge learnt to practical, real-life contexts. We put a high value on practical teaching and so a core part of your teaching will focus on developing hands-on practical and associated research skills.

Independent study is an important part of University learning and you will be expected to undertake private study. We will support you in becoming independent learners through our teaching approaches and through regular meetings with your personal tutor who is there to advise you academically.

We use a range of digital tools to enhance your learning. Through our Minerva learning management system, you will be able to access our extensive library of online materials, some of it designed specifically to support preparation prior to attending classroom sessions and discuss content with peers and teachers. In the classroom, educators use a variety of interactive digital tools to help you learn through discussion and debate. Laboratory practicals are accompanied by detailed online preparation guides and use of electronic laboratory notebooks to ensure you get the most out of your time and develop workplace skills.

On this course you’ll be taught by our expert academics, from lecturers through to professors. You may also be taught by industry professionals with years of experience, as well as trained postgraduate researchers, connecting you to some of the brightest minds on campus.

Assessment

Assessment on the course is a varied mix of course work submitted during the semester and exam periods (Jan and May) each year. A portfolio of assessment approaches are used.

There is also a mixture of multiple choice questions, short answer questions and longer essay questions used in an online time limited assessment.

Many modules adopt authentic assessment approaches where appropriate. These assessments aim to develop the personal and professional skills required in the workplace. This includes:

  • writing laboratory or other reports
  • grant applications
  • oral presentations
  • poster presentations
  • reflective accounts and portfolios

Communicating science to a wider audience is a key skill. In some circumstances there may be a choice of assessment piece to make it more relevant, meaningful and engaging for you.

Assessments in the school are prepared in a fair and inclusive manner adhering to relevant and up to date guidance.

Entry requirements

A-level: AAB

Including biology or chemistry, plus another science or science-related subject. Critical thinking and general studies excluded.

We accept the following:

  • Science: biology, human biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, PE.

  • Science-related: computing, environmental science, food science, geography, geology, psychology, statistics.

Applicants taking a Science A-level (in England) will be required to achieve a pass in the practical element in addition to the standard A-level grade requirement.

When an applicant is taking the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), the Cambridge International Project Qualification (Cambridge IPQ) or Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate, this can be considered alongside A-levels and may attract an alternative offer in addition to the standard offer. If you’re taking A-levels, this would be a 1 grade drop from the standard offer. For example A in one of the above qualifications with ABB at A-level (BSc applicants).

GCSE: Grade 6 (B) or above at GCSE maths and Grade 4 (C) or above at GCSE English. The Faculty of Biological Sciences will accept Level 2 Functional Skills English in lieu of GCSE English.

Alternative qualification

Access to HE Diploma

BSc:
Pass 60 credits overall with 45 credits at Level 3, graded at D39M6P0 including distinctions in biology and mathematics or chemistry. Accept Access courses in Applied Science and Science.
Will also consider (depending on subject content):

  • biochemical sciences

  • biological and health science

  • biological sciences

  • biosciences

  • combined sciences

  • life and biological science

  • physical sciences

MBiol:
We do not accept Access to HE.

BTEC

BSc:
BTEC extended diploma entry requirements: DDM plus A/B in A-level biology or chemistry. The preferred BTEC qualification subject is Applied Science (other subjects may be accepted).

BTEC diploma entry requirements: DD plus A/B in A-level biology or chemistry. The preferred BTEC qualification subject is Applied Science (other subjects may be accepted).

Applicants with BTEC Subsidiary Diploma qualifications must normally have at least 2 A-levels and at least one of these should be biology or chemistry (plus another science or science-related subject depending on the BTEC subject).

MBiol:
We do not accept BTEC qualifications.

Cambridge Pre-U

BSc:
D3/D3/M1 including D3 in biology or chemistry plus another science or science-related subject. Global Perspectives excluded.

MBiol:
D3/D3/D3 including D3 in biology or chemistry plus another science or science-related subject. Global Perspectives excluded.

When an applicant is taking Global Perspectives this can be considered alongside Pre-U subjects and may attract an alternative offer in addition to the standard offer. This would be D3/M1/M1 and grade D3 in Global Perspectives (BSc applicants) or D3/D3/M1 and grade D3 in Global Perspectives (MBiol applicants).

International Baccalaureate

BSc: 6,6,5 at higher level including Biology or Chemistry and another science or science-related subject.

MBiol: 6,6,6 at higher level including Biology or Chemistry and another science or science-related subject.

Irish Leaving Certificate (higher Level)

BSc:
H2,H2,H2,H2,H3,H3 including H2 in biology or chemistry, and another science or science-related subject at higher level.

MBiol:
H2,H2,H2,H2,H2,H2 including biology or chemistry, and another science or science-related at higher level.

Scottish Highers / Advanced Highers

BSc:
Advanced Higher: 5 x Highers AABBB, with AB in 2 Advanced Highers including biology or chemistry, plus another science or science-related subject. Critical thinking and general studies excluded.

MBiol:
Advanced Higher: 5 x Highers AABBB, with AA in 2 Advanced Highers including biology or chemistry, plus another science or science-related subject. Critical thinking and general studies excluded.

We accept the following:

  • Science subjects: biology, human biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics.
  • Science-related subjects: geography, PE, psychology, use of maths and statistics.

Scottish Higher: Scottish Highers not accepted on their own.

Read more about UK and Republic of Ireland accepted qualifications or contact the School’s Undergraduate Admissions Team.

Alternative entry

We’re committed to identifying the best possible applicants, regardless of personal circumstances or background.

Access to Leeds is a contextual admissions scheme which accepts applications from individuals who might be from low income households, in the first generation of their immediate family to apply to higher education, or have had their studies disrupted.

Find out more about Access to Leeds and contextual admissions.

Typical Access to Leeds offer

Specific A Level subjects required – see entry requirement section above.

GCSE: Grade 6 (B) or above at GCSE Maths and Grade 4 (C) or above at GCSE English.

Access to Leeds: Pass

Interdisciplinary Science with Foundation Year

This course is designed for students whose backgrounds mean they are less likely to attend university (also known as widening participation backgrounds) and who do not currently meet admissions criteria for direct entry to a degree.

The course will give you the opportunity to be taught by academic staff and provides intensive support to enable your development of academic skills and knowledge. On successful completion of your foundation year, you will progress to your chosen degree course.

Find out more about the Interdiscplinary Science with Foundation Year.

International Foundation Year

International students who do not meet the academic requirements for undergraduate study may be able to study the University of Leeds International Foundation Year. This gives you the opportunity to study on campus, be taught by University of Leeds academics and progress onto a wide range of Leeds undergraduate courses. Find out more about International Foundation Year programmes.

English language requirements

IELTS 6.0 overall, with no less than 5.5 in any component. . For other English qualifications, read English language equivalent qualifications.


Improve your English
If you're an international student and you don't meet the English language requirements for this programme, you may be able to study our undergraduate pre-sessional English course, to help improve your English language level.

Fees

UK: To be confirmed

International: To be confirmed

Tuition fees for UK undergraduate students starting in 2024/25
Tuition fees for UK full-time undergraduate students are set by the UK Government and will be £9,250 for students starting in 2024/25.

The fee may increase in future years of your course in line with inflation only, as a consequence of future changes in Government legislation and as permitted by law.

Tuition fees for UK undergraduate students starting in 2025/26
Tuition fees for UK full-time undergraduate students starting in 2025/26 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. When the fee is available we will update individual course pages.

Tuition fees for international undergraduate students starting in 2024/25 and 2025/26
Tuition fees for international students for 2024/25 are available on individual course pages. Fees for students starting in 2025/26 will be available from September 2024.

Tuition fees for a study abroad or work placement year
If you take a study abroad or work placement year, you’ll pay a reduced tuition fee during this period. For more information, see Study abroad and work placement tuition fees and loans.

Read more about paying fees and charges.

There may be additional costs related to your course or programme of study, or related to being a student at the University of Leeds. Read more on our living costs and budgeting page.

Scholarships and financial support

If you have the talent and drive, we want you to be able to study with us, whatever your financial circumstances. There is help for students in the form of loans and non-repayable grants from the University and from the government. Find out more in our Undergraduate funding overview.

Applying

Apply to this course through UCAS. Check the deadline for applications on the UCAS website.

International students apply through UCAS in the same way as UK students. Our network of international representatives can help you with your application. If you’re unsure about the application process, contact the admissions team for help.

Read about visas, immigration and other information in International students. We recommend that international students apply as early as possible to ensure that they have time to apply for their visa.

Admissions guidance

Visit our admissions guidance page for more information about applying to undergraduate courses in the Faculty of Biological Sciences.

Application process

The Faculty of Biological Sciences may consider applications submitted after this date. Availability of courses in UCAS Extra will be detailed by UCAS at the appropriate stage in the cycle.

Alternative Entry Scheme for mature applicants

As per the information detailed in the corresponding section of the University of Leeds Taught Admissions Policy the Faculty of Biological Sciences will consider prospective students via the Alternative Entry Scheme run by the Lifelong Learning where appropriate applicants will be referred to the Lifelong Learning Centre, who will advise the applicant further.

Interviews

Except for those courses detailed below, interviews do not form part of the Faculty of Biological Sciences’ standard admissions process however, in some cases, an applicant may be invited for an interview if it will help inform whether or not an offer should be made.

Admissions policy

University of Leeds Admissions Policy 2025

This course is taught by

Faculty of Biological Sciences

Contact us

Faculty of Biological Sciences Undergraduate Admissions Office

Email: fbsadmissions@leeds.ac.uk
Telephone:

Career opportunities

As well as providing you with subject-specific knowledge, we aim to equip you with the best possible skills for a variety of future careers. All of our degrees have a strong emphasis on practical based teaching, small group teaching, online learning and problem solving.

Throughout the degree, you’ll gain a wide range of transferable skills which are highly valued by employers. Supported by the faculty student opportunity team, Leeds for Life scheme and your academic and personal tutor, you’ll be ideally placed to focus on your personal development and make the most of your time at university.

Studying biomedical sciences at the University of Leeds will prepare you for a wide range of biomedical and science-related careers, or careers in the wider community or Society. This could be a career in laboratory-based science, whether in the field of research or clinical healthcare or as the foundation for further study in medical fields.

Typical graduate careers include:

  • academic Researcher
  • biomedical Scientist
  • clinical Research Associate
  • clinical Scientist
  • physician Associate
  • medical communications

Examples of recent graduate destinations include:

  • clinical support worker
  • PhD Breast Cancer Research
  • MSc Physiotherapy
  • graduate medicine
  • research technician
  • scientific copy editor

This course can open up opportunities in other careers outside science where scientific skills are required and relevant to success for example global health policy, public engagement, accountancy and finance.

Careers support

We have a dedicated student opportunity team in the Faculty of Biological Sciences who work closely with the University’s Careers Centre.

We offer numerous opportunities in addition to volunteering and placements. This includes our annual student-alumni networking event, where graduates are invited back to talk about their work and network with our students, and our STEM Careers Fair. The fair is an amazing opportunity for you to meet bioscience employers, such as AstraZeneca, Labcorp, GSK, Nuffield and NHS Ecological consultancies. You will be able to speak to alumni, attend workshops and more.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more about Careers support.

Study abroad and work placements

Study abroad

On this course you have the opportunity to apply to spend time abroad, usually as an extra academic year. We have over 300 University partners worldwide and popular destinations for our students include Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Africa and Latin America. 

Find out more at the Study Abroad website.

If you choose to undertake a study abroad option, you will spend the third year of the your course studying abroad. This will extend your studies by 12 months.

Work placements

Practical work experience can help you decide on your career and improve your employability. On this course you have the option to apply to take a placement year module with organisations across the public, private and voluntary sectors in the UK, or overseas.

Find out more about work experience on the Careers website.

Industrial placements are taken after your second year. This will extend your studies by 12 months. For your work placement in industry, the staff at Leeds will help you with your CV and recruitment process and provide details of organisations.

Placements abroad are possible. We work together with your industrial supervisors to make sure you get the most out of this year. A year working in industry gives you an excellent opportunity to get used to the demands of the world of work, to develop new skills and to augment your CV.

Combined study and working abroad

Our new module allows you to combine both a study abroad and industrial work placement into one additional year of study. Over the year you will study for a semester at one of our partner universities and complete an industrial work placement for 6 months abroad or in the UK.

Find out more about Combined study and work abroad.

Student profile: Titilayo Olanipekun

The international office has been really helpful, they are easily accessible and are able to offer help to any queries in which one might have, from finances to travelling.
Find out more about Titilayo Olanipekun's time at Leeds